February and March are typically the snowiest month for much of North America – When you are photographing falling snow think about the mood you want to convey and decide which shutter speed is right for you. Your aperture will play a role here too. Large apertures/shallow depth of field will produce bigger out of focus flakes and a smaller aperture/larger depth of field will produce smaller flakes.

Shutter Speed can be used to convey motion! I often use a slow shutter speed when photographing rushing water to smooth it all out, creating a peaceful scene. Or you can pan the camera at slower shutter speeds while tracking a subject creating motion blur everywhere except your subject. You can see these techniques and more in my shutter speed video below. In this post I just want to share the effects of shutter speed on falling snow.

1/250 of a second
1/125 of a second
1/60 of a second
1/30 of a second

 

Depending on the speed and size of the snowflakes your results may vary slightly but experiment and see what works best for your scene and the mood you are trying to convey.

 

 

 

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 Wrapping up the Sony event. Not allowed to share images from the a9 for a few more days so take a look at this wavy #NYC building I shot with my phone #fb
 What do you want to know? #a9 $4500, available end of May 24MP, 20fps, 60fps for AF calculations. No blackout, I spied a small joystick nub on back and 200RAW Images buffer. #fb
 The view from my hotel room. Hello #NYC


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