Hands-on Review Canon T7i (800D) vs Nikon D5600

Canon T7i (800D) vs Nikon D5600 https://youtu.be/RgMMO1jCCz8The Nikon D5600 and Canon T7i (800D) share several specs

  • 24-MP (APS-C) Sensors
  • ISO range 100-25,600
  • 3 inch LCD Touchscreen though the D5600 is a little bigger (3.2") and offers the touchpad function when it is up to your eye.
  • 1080 at 60 fps
  • Bluetooth, WiFi and NFC connectivity - Though the D5600s snapbridge is a little more automated, automatically sending files across - with the Canon it is more of a conscious choice. I have been very frustrated with Nikon Snapbridge in the past - finding it flaky, confusing and downright broken, with the D5600 I have had a very smooth experience and prefer it to the Canon - But the Canon app provides a better experience for controlling the camera.

A few important differences - Nikon offers 39 AF points, 9 cross type, Canon offers 45 AF points all cross type - cross type offer a  higher accuracy and when you have more higher accuracy points the more likely you are to get moving subjects in accurate focus. Canon also offers dual pixel AF in live view - this is the very smooth and capable video focus, also useful for still photos in live view - Nikon’s video focusing is still distracting (it hunts more and is very noticeable when it refocuses) and while it’s a little quieter and smoother with their new AF-P lenses you still don’t want the lens to refocus during video, canon, however, is smooth and SILENT when paired with STM lensesThe Canon is faster offering 6fps, vs 5 in the Nikon and more importantly, the Canon offers a deeper buffer - up to 148 jpegs and 24 raw images before slowing down. Nikon slows down at 100 JPEGS and just 8 raw.  The buffer and the additional higher accuracy AF points make the Canon T7i my choice for any type of action, like sports or birds in flight, over the Nikon.  The Nikon is capable of fast focus and operation but you will find yourself limited to very short bursts if shooting RAW. The Nikon D5600, however, has an edge in image quality, especially as the light levels drop. I see a clear difference, the Nikon has no AA filter and provides more detailed images and as you raise the ISO less noise (you can also pick 1/3 stops of ISO - canon limited to full stops) Nikon D5600 on the left | Canon T7i on the rightNikon D5600 Frustrations (Especially for beginners)I find myself spending more time in live view - especially when I have a nice articulating screen that lets me set up for different angles and if you happen to have manual video mode on you are blocked from changing the aperture in manual mode in live view and you can’t select shutter speeds below 1/30 of a second.  There are workarounds, the easiest is to switch to aperture priority or shutter speed priority OR turn off manual movie mode but then frustratingly when you go to shoot a movie you have no idea what settings and no control no matter which mode you use. AND I really miss exposure simultaion when using the Nikon D5600 the T7i does and actually every other camera besides Nikon offers exposure simulation in Live view. When inn manual mode I would like to see the screen change to reflect my exposure and the Nikon only does that if you are in manual movie mode and once again we are back to being blocked from changing the aperture and from setting shutter speed below 1/30 of a second. These two issues are in no way deal breakers but they certainly make the camera more frustrating for me and when I work with beginners, teaching photography all over the world - being able to switch to live view and get that easy feedback of your exposure before you take a photo is a really useful tool.Summary and Conclusion - Nikon D5600 vs Canon T7i (800D)Reasons you might want to pick the Nikon D5600 - you value the smaller size, the better image quality (especially in lower light), The additional features like time lapse (Canon only offers movie lapse) and the exceptionally easy and automated Ssnapbridge image sharing. Reasons you might choose the Canon - Video is important to you, the Dual Pixel AF is smooth and sneaky good, you plan to photograph action and or you want a straightforward manual control experience.Other Options -The Panasonic G85 is even smaller, especially when you start comparing lenses - the micro 4/3rd system stays small even when you have a few primes in your bag AND shoots beautifully stabilized 4k video.  The Sony a6300 also shoots 4k and does very well in low light though it isn’t as user friendly as either of these cameras.   Which would you choose - I’d love to know your opinion?   And don't forget to pick up a prime lens or twoCanon T7i Strengths