Hands-on Review Canon T7i (800D) vs Nikon D5600

Canon T7i (800D) vs Nikon D5600 https://youtu.be/RgMMO1jCCz8The Nikon D5600 and Canon T7i (800D) share several specs

  • 24-MP (APS-C) Sensors
  • ISO range 100-25,600
  • 3 inch LCD Touchscreen though the D5600 is a little bigger (3.2") and offers the touchpad function when it is up to your eye.
  • 1080 at 60 fps
  • Bluetooth, WiFi and NFC connectivity - Though the D5600s snapbridge is a little more automated, automatically sending files across - with the Canon it is more of a conscious choice. I have been very frustrated with Nikon Snapbridge in the past - finding it flaky, confusing and downright broken, with the D5600 I have had a very smooth experience and prefer it to the Canon - But the Canon app provides a better experience for controlling the camera.

A few important differences - Nikon offers 39 AF points, 9 cross type, Canon offers 45 AF points all cross type - cross type offer a  higher accuracy and when you have more higher accuracy points the more likely you are to get moving subjects in accurate focus. Canon also offers dual pixel AF in live view - this is the very smooth and capable video focus, also useful for still photos in live view - Nikon’s video focusing is still distracting (it hunts more and is very noticeable when it refocuses) and while it’s a little quieter and smoother with their new AF-P lenses you still don’t want the lens to refocus during video, canon, however, is smooth and SILENT when paired with STM lensesThe Canon is faster offering 6fps, vs 5 in the Nikon and more importantly, the Canon offers a deeper buffer - up to 148 jpegs and 24 raw images before slowing down. Nikon slows down at 100 JPEGS and just 8 raw.  The buffer and the additional higher accuracy AF points make the Canon T7i my choice for any type of action, like sports or birds in flight, over the Nikon.  The Nikon is capable of fast focus and operation but you will find yourself limited to very short bursts if shooting RAW. The Nikon D5600, however, has an edge in image quality, especially as the light levels drop. I see a clear difference, the Nikon has no AA filter and provides more detailed images and as you raise the ISO less noise (you can also pick 1/3 stops of ISO - canon limited to full stops) Nikon D5600 on the left | Canon T7i on the rightNikon D5600 Frustrations (Especially for beginners)I find myself spending more time in live view - especially when I have a nice articulating screen that lets me set up for different angles and if you happen to have manual video mode on you are blocked from changing the aperture in manual mode in live view and you can’t select shutter speeds below 1/30 of a second.  There are workarounds, the easiest is to switch to aperture priority or shutter speed priority OR turn off manual movie mode but then frustratingly when you go to shoot a movie you have no idea what settings and no control no matter which mode you use. AND I really miss exposure simultaion when using the Nikon D5600 the T7i does and actually every other camera besides Nikon offers exposure simulation in Live view. When inn manual mode I would like to see the screen change to reflect my exposure and the Nikon only does that if you are in manual movie mode and once again we are back to being blocked from changing the aperture and from setting shutter speed below 1/30 of a second. These two issues are in no way deal breakers but they certainly make the camera more frustrating for me and when I work with beginners, teaching photography all over the world - being able to switch to live view and get that easy feedback of your exposure before you take a photo is a really useful tool.Summary and Conclusion - Nikon D5600 vs Canon T7i (800D)Reasons you might want to pick the Nikon D5600 - you value the smaller size, the better image quality (especially in lower light), The additional features like time lapse (Canon only offers movie lapse) and the exceptionally easy and automated Ssnapbridge image sharing. Reasons you might choose the Canon - Video is important to you, the Dual Pixel AF is smooth and sneaky good, you plan to photograph action and or you want a straightforward manual control experience.Other Options -The Panasonic G85 is even smaller, especially when you start comparing lenses - the micro 4/3rd system stays small even when you have a few primes in your bag AND shoots beautifully stabilized 4k video.  The Sony a6300 also shoots 4k and does very well in low light though it isn’t as user friendly as either of these cameras.   Which would you choose - I’d love to know your opinion?   And don't forget to pick up a prime lens or twoCanon T7i Strengths
 

Canon T7i (800D) vs Nikon D5600

Canon T7i (800D) vs Nikon D5600With the Nikon D5600 now available for the US and Canon T7i available for pre-order it's that time again for a bit of a comparison. At one point, Nikon had put on a good showing with the D5300 leading the market for photography while our video recommendation had been going to the Canon T5i. Since then Nikon camera's have been stagnating under minor updates while the  T7i got a decent upgrade in processing, sensor, connectivity, and focus certainly pushing it closer to the top of our list.

What's Different?

The T7i has faster autofocus that can see better in low light conditions and now includes 45 cross-type AF points. Live view focus uses the Dual Pixel AF which makes for smooth and cinematic like focusing for video. In comparison, the D5600 offers 39 AF points with only 9 being cross-type.  And live view focusing on the D5600 still uses the older, slower Contrast AF method.While the D5600 can't match the T7i's focusing it does come with new AF-P 18-55 lenses using stepping motors similar to Canon's STM system.  While we haven't tested the lenses yet stepping motors allow the camera smoother and quieter transitions while focusing for video. At the moment though Nikon's AF-P selection is very limited compared to the growing selection of Canon STM lenses.Autofocus - Canon T7i | Live View Autofocus: CanonNikon, since the D5300, has removed the anti-aliasing filter allowing for sharper photos. While the D5600 has seen improvements in connectivity it still uses the SnapBridge system which we do not recommend. Overall comparatively, you do save $100 going with Nikon, just enough for accessories such as a bag, batteries, or a tripod.Image Quality  - Sharpness: Nikon D5600 |Overall in this latest generation, things are looking strong for Canon. We'll have more on the T7i when Toby gets in a review unit soon. On paper at least Canon borrowed from the 80D enough to make a decent upgrade this year. Nikon still has its strength, which is crisp photos thanks to the removed filter, making a good choice. Canon keeps pushing ease of using making some very friendly cameras for a new DSLR beginner or someone that wants an upgrade from a previous model. Overall we have to give it to Canon as it makes for a better overall platform to use with great support and lens choices.Canon T7i Strengths

  • Smoother focusing Dual Pixel AF in Live view
  • 45 Cross-Type AF points  for faster focusing in low light
  • Ease of use
  • Better lens ecosystem, in this case primarily for entry-level users
  • Faster burst with deeper buffer

Nikon D5600 Strengths

  • No anti-aliasing filter allowing for sharper photos
  • Longer battery life
  • Smaller and slightly lighter
  • Better mobile app and connectivity vs Nikon SnapBridge
  • Better low light performance
  • Slightly cheaper
Specifications
Spec Canon T7i Nikon D5600
MP 24 24
ISO 100-25600 (expands to 51200) 100-25600
Processor Digic 7 Expeed 4
Number of AF pts 45 (all cross type) 39 (9 cross type)
Viewfinder Pentamirror 95% Pentamirror 95%
Anti-Alias Filter Yes No
Live View AF speed Excellent Good
Top Shutter Speed 1/4000 1/4000
Flash Sync Speed 1/200 1/200
FPS 6 5
Low Light focusing -3 EV (very good) -1
Video 1080p60 1080p60
Headphone Jack No No
Mic Jack Yes Yes
Connectivity WIFI/NFC/Bluetooth LE WIFI/NFC/Bluetooth
Battery Life 600 Shots 820 Shots
Weight 532 g (1.17 lb / 18.77 oz) 465 g (1 lb 0.4 oz / 16.04 oz)
Current Price $1299 with 18-135$899 with 18-55$749 Body $1,196.95 with 18-140$796.95 with 18-55$1,146.95 with 18-55 and 70-300$696.95 Body
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Canon EOS Rebel T7i

Canon EOS T7i Line

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Nikon D5600 DSLR Camera with 18-55mm Lens

Nikon D5600 Line

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Photo Comparison
Nikon D5600(left) vs Canon T7i(right) front view
Nikon D5600(left) vs Canon T7i(right) back view
Nikon D5600(left) vs Canon T7i(right) top view
Nikon D5600(left) vs Canon T7i(right) right view
Nikon D5600(left) vs Canon T7i(right) left view

CES 2017: Nikon D5600 Price and Release Date

Nikon D5600When Nikon announced their next entry level DSLR in November the Nikon D5600 was dropped with its specs but no details on price or when it was coming to the US. This week at CES they announced it’s coming soon, this month in fact. Coming in multiple kits, the Nikon D5600 will be released this month with the AF-P 18-55mm F3.5-5.6G lens for $799, with the AF-S 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G lens for $1199, with the 18-55 and AF-P 70-300mm F4.5-6.3G lenses for $1149, and body only for $699. Actually $100 less than the D5500 when it was announced last year.

Whats New?
  • Upgraded Touchscreen features such as cropping and frame advance
  • Nikon Snapbridge though WiFI, Bluetooth, and NFC allowing for things such as automatic image transfer, time sync, location info, remote control, and more
  • In-Camera Time-Lapse movie function brought from the higher end models
Available For Pre-Order at

Nikon D5600 DSLR Camera with 18-140mm LensNikon D5600 with18-140mm Lens Nikon D5600 DSLR Camera with 18-55mm LensNikon D5600 with18-55mm Lens Nikon D5600 DSLR Camera with 18-55mm and 70-300mm Lenses Nikon D5600 with18-55mm and 70-300mm Lenses Nikon D5600 DSLR Camera (Body Only) Nikon D5600(Body Only)

Specifications

  • APS-C 24.2 MP CMOS Sensor
  • DX-Format
  • Expeed 4 Image Processor
  • 5 fps continuous shooting
  • 25,600 max ISO
  • Removed low-pass filter
  • 39-point AF System
  • 3.2” articulating touchscreen
  • 1080p Video at 60fps
  • Snapbridge using Bluetooth, WiFi, and NFC
  • Time-Lapse Movie Recording
  • Dimensions (WxHxD) 4.9 x 3.8 x 2.8" / 124.0 x 97.0 x 70.0 mm
  • Weight 1.02 lb / 465 g