5 Reasons the 40mm is Better Than the 50mm

Canon 40mm f/2.8 Lens - 5 Reasons the 40mm is Better Than the 50mm | http://www.photorec.tvI picked up the Canon 40mm f/2.8 on a whim before traveling to Europe last year. My husband and I were both bringing DSLR cameras, and I wanted us to have the flexibility to shoot with versatile prime lenses at the same time. While we didn't shoot with primes much on the trip (if you've been part of a large travel group, you know how it goes), I've been shooting with it quite a bit since then. I cannot even believe how much I love the 40mm lens. With a few exceptions (such as when I'm doing macro photography), the 40mm is my standard lens now.I know that the Canon 50mm f/1.8 or "Nifty Fifty" is most people's top pick for an all-around go-to prime lens. It was my go-to prime lens for many years, too. After shooting with the 40mm extensively for almost a year now, I can't believe how much better it is than the 50mm f/1.8. For the slight price difference, it seems like a no-brainer to pick up the 40mm.There are a few key reasons I think the Canon 40mm f/2.8 is a better lens than the Canon 50mm f/1.8.

  1. The build quality is better.
  2. It focuses more quickly, accurately, and quietly.
  3. The focal length is more versatile for indoor shooting.
  4. It allows for closer focusing.
  5. It's smaller.

The only time I still prefer to shoot with the 50mm f/1.8 over the 40mm f/2.8 is when I'm in a low-light situation. Personally, I most often shoot in extreme low-light in bars or jazz clubs, taking pictures of a band. Wedding venues are another popular low-light photography environment. The full extra stop of light that the 50mm offers allows you to keep your ISO much lower in these low-light settings.I elaborate on all of these points and more in the full post. I have the full 5 Reasons the 40mm is Better Than the 50mm post over on my blog.

I'd love to hear your thoughts!Do you think that the 40mm is Better than the 50mm?

Leave a comment!

We also have a great discussion about the 40mm vs. the 50mm on Instagram. Share your insight there, too!

Canon SL2 200D Review vs Sony a6000/6300

The Canon Sl2 - a camera I didn't think Canon was going to make…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ov7vnZ7ijoM [gallery td_select_gallery_slide="slide" size="medium" td_gallery_title_input="Canon SL2 (200D) Sample Images" ids="17148,17149,17150,17151,17152,17153,17154"]RAW FILES FOR DOWNLOAD AND PERSONAL USE ONLY

Canon vs Sony Recommendations

For easy photo and video with huge & affordable lens selectionBuy Canon SL2  with the kit lensAdd on the Canon 40mm f/2.8 lensFor better quality images and video in a smaller, but less friendly packageBuy Sony a6000  (Cheaper with a two lens package!)Buy Sony a6300 for 4k and better viewfinder Buy Sigma 30mm For small lightweight prime

Why you should have a prime lens

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nODUWChwfMU&t=5s 

Nikon D850 Hands-on Review | Sample Images

The Nikon D850 is easily the best DSLR on the markethttps://youtu.be/foxvRAw3fI0Highlights of the Nikon D850

  • This camera feels wonderful in the hand and offers a control layout that just works really well - except auto ISO dial, it's a little awkward to switch that on and off- but bracketing, focus modes, the excellent and dedicated focus nub all make for an extremely pleasing operation.

  • Lighted buttons, something they started with the D500 and standing under the stars a few nights ago in Acadia NP - all the other photographers on the trip were quite jealous of my softly illuminated buttons that make low light and night photography a dream

  • Beautiful big bright viewfinder AND a vibrant and gorgeous screen that is fully touch-enabled the menus work, touch to focus works even with heavy ND filters on AND it is articulated - though like Sony only tilting.

  • Additional features - like intervalometer that makes possible an 8k time lapse - you can drop to 4k and have the video created in camera. The 8k just produces stills that you need to use software to turn into a video. Focus peaking through frustratingly it doesn’t work when shooting 4k, only at 1080p, focus shift for stacking and creating images with huge depth of field which can be useful in some situations.

  • Awesome image quality- excellent image quality with lots of room to brighten the shadows before you see noise and great higher ISO performance AND a 45mp sensor. Zooming on these images is lovely - so much detail, so much room to crop.

  • 4k video, that isn't cropped AND this is all packaged in a capable and versatile camera.

  • Impressive AF system,

  • Access to all of Nikon lenses

  • Greatly improved live view experience vs past Nikon cameras

Negatives of the Nikon D850

  • Focus during video is terrible, extremely distracting slow, hunting- you can use an AF-P lens and it gets a little smoother but still nothing like the dual pixel AF of Canon or Sony’s smooth AF system.

  • Shooting video without a viewfinder is difficult in brighter conditions and the focus peaking that Nikon nicely added doesn’t work during 4k filming

  • DSLR focusing systems often need AF adjustments to work their best and while Nikon provides an in-camera system for adjusting focus - it is limiting and I have images that are out of focus due to alignment or shutter shock or mirror slap.

  • Disappointing battery life if you find yourself using the screen often

  • Customizable buttons are limited in what you can assign

  • It’s a BIG camera. Sure for some of you that’s a check mark in the pro column but after using a variety of mirrorless cameras over the last year I appreciate a smaller, lighter camera and yes, if using a full frame Sony as you start to add lenses the weight savings start to disappear but you at least have the option of traveling much lighter at times with lightweight lenses.

Nikon D850 vs D500

The D500 is a little lighter (155g lighter) a little faster (10 fps vs 7fps, though you can bump that up with the battery grip for the Nikon D850) and you get more reach with the D500 crop sensor and can use lighter, smaller crop lenses BUT the D850 has a crop mode that will give you that same extra reach and provides excellent edge to edge AF coverage. The D850 also does much better in low light with that full frame sensor.Buy the D500 if you are dedicated wildlife or sports/action photographer and spend the savings on a nice telephoto lens.Everyone else should buy the D850 for it's excellent all-around image quality and low light performance.Should you upgrade from the Nikon D750. Honestly, the D750 is still one of the best values in DSLRs on the market and continues to perform well. Only upgrade if you have been frustrated with low light performance or AF system.

D850

D850

amazon logo

amazon logo

Sigma 24-105

Sigma 24-105

amazon logo

amazon logo

D500

D500

amazon logo

amazon logo

Sample Nikon D850 Photos

All in all, I would be very happy to use this camera for landscapes where I can use the screen and know that focus is really dialed in. Throw the very sharp sigma 24-105 f/4 on and you have a killer combination. But these days I do appreciate a lighter camera and will often choose a Sony over the Nikon. Especially the new Sony a7R III Use the link squarespace.com/photorectv to save 10% off your purchase of a site or domain name and find the link below for a more helpful guide.

The Best Lenses for Photographing the Stars & Milkyway

Star Photography

Full Frame Prime Lens Options

★ Sigma 14mm f/1.8 Watch my video review - $1599.00 (autofocus)

Good
  • Widest aperture lens at this focal length (allows for shorter exposures and or exposures with low ISO shooting the stars, Milky Way and Aurora Borealis
  • Sharp, minimal distortion
  • Autofocus (versatile during the daytime)

Bad

  • Expensive
  • Some Coma on brighter stars, wide open
  • Heavy with bulbous front end

Despite some Coma wide open, this is the BEST lens you can buy for shooting the stars - nothing else is this sharp, this fast. Watch my video review for more information and sample images. 

★ Irix Firefly 15mm f/2.4Watch my video review - $400 (manual focus)

  • Sharp, minimal distortion
  • Locking focus ring
  • Glowing Lens markings for night time shooting
  • Focus click at infinity
  • Customizable focus

Bad

  • Uses 95mm filters

I struggle to come up with anything bad to say about this lens. Sure it uses 95mm Filters and all but the thinnest filters will add some vignetting but it is one of the only lenses on this list that even takes screw on filters. It is very easy to work with in the dark, the locking focus ring and the click stop at infinity focus are helpful when shooting the stars. It is as sharp as the Sigma too! All of this for just $400!

★ Rokinon 24mm f/1.4$429 (Manual Focus) 

Good
  • Faster Aperture
  • Full Frame compatible
  • Takes Filters
  • Lovely walk around focal length for general photography

Bad

  • On crop 24 = 36mm, less exciting for wide starry skies
  • Manual focus only

On a full frame, 24mm is often plenty wide enough for a nice starry sky or milky way shot. At f/1.4 this is a fast lens, is useful for daytime landscape shots with a normal filter size of 77mm but manual focus only does limit the versatility of this lens and it isn't the sharpest option here.

Samyang 10mm f/2.8 ED AS NCS CS Lens$429 (Best Option for Crop DSLRs)

Good
  • 16mm on Crop - nice and wide

Bad

  • Crop Only
  • No filter threads - Costly filter system for daytime use

The widest & best option for crop users on the list (I don't love the fisheye look for stars or milky way photos) This small, light and affordable lens is hard to beat but the slightly faster IRIX firefly is sharper and offer some nice features that make it worth the sacrifice of a few mm.

★ Rokinon 8mm f/3.5 HD Fisheye Lens with Removable Hood$232 - $299

Good
  • This lens is VERY wide with the typical fisheye look
  • Very affordable.

Bad

  • Crop Only
  • No filters
  • f/3.5
  • Fisheye even more limited in use.

I don't love the look from a fisheye lens for the stars or milky way shots but if you do this would be the lens to grab.  The good news, it is super affordable!

★ Rokinon 12mm f/2.0 NCS CS$299 - $399 (Best for Mirrorless APS-C or smaller)

Good
  • Very portable
  • Takes filters
  • Fast f/2.0

Bad

This tiny lens is great for mirrorless crop sensor photographers shooting Sony, Fuji, Panasonic or Olympus. It takes filters, is very affordable and lightweight, not quite as sharp and offers a little more distortion than the IRIX or Sigma but excellent still.

Ultra Wide Angle Zooms

(see linked video below)

★ Tokina 11-16 f/2.8$430 Best value ultra wide angle zoom for crop sensors

Good
  • Versatile lens
  • Excellent Value
  • Accepts 77mm Filters

Bad

  • Some distortion and Chromatic abberation
  • Not as sharp as the primes listed

The Tokina 11-16 for Canon and Nikon is one of the best value lenses on this list. It's not the sharpest and certainly has more distortion than the primes but it is a versatile lens with a good range and offer autofocus along with filter use making it possible to tackle a variety of situations.

Additional Lenses to Consider - 

Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM Lens - Sharp, fast and relatively little distortion for an ultra-wide zoom lens and accepts regular filters AND is travel-friendly. - B&H Photo for $1,999.00Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 Di VC USD - One of the few ultra wide full frame lenses that offer stabilization. If you are careful you can handhold this at almost a second exposure. Not really helpful for stars/Milkyway but still useful. More distortion and not as sharp as the Canon listed above or the Nikon listed below but still a versatile lens . though be aware it's HEAVY - B&H Photo for $1,099.00Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED Lens - The gold standard for ultra wide angle zooms.Incredibly sharp and useful though it is big and heavy - B&H Photo for $1,896.95

 

Related Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8An3dzcgCWE

Affordable Ultra Wide Angle Zooms for Crop Cameras

Canon 10-18 vs Canon 10-22 vs Tokina 11-16Learn more about the Tokina 11-16 vs the Canon 10-18 and Canon 10-22

Wide Angle Prime Lenses for Canon & Nikon

https://youtu.be/8An3dzcgCWE Download Full Raw Images from All three lenses. Sigma 14mm ART Samples, Irix 15mm Blackstone Samples and Rokinon/Samyang 14mm f/2.8 Sample RAW Images. (images for personal comparison only)Buy the IRIX 15mm LensBuy the SIgma 14mm LensBuy the Rokinon/Samyang 14mm LensEdited Sample Images[gallery td_select_gallery_slide="slide" td_gallery_title_input="Sigma 14mm Sample Images" ids="15953,15954,15955,15956"]Additional Sigma 14mm Samples Shot by Steve Scurich Photography[gallery td_select_gallery_slide="slide" ids="15959,15960,15961,15962,15963,15964,15965,15966"]IRIX Blackstone 15mm Sample Shots[gallery td_select_gallery_slide="slide" ids="15967,15968,15969,15970"]

 

Gear Talk - Wide Angle Lenses and Travel Friendly Systems

First Impressions of the Canon 6D Mark II, Fuji X-T2, Irix 15mm f/2.4, Sigma 14mm f/1.8, Samyang 14mm f/2.8, Rokinon 35mm f/1.8, DJI Spark and a discussion of the best travel camera system. Which of these items are you most interested in hear/seeing a full review about?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwoprlMPzsESee a complete list of the gear I am taking to Joshua Tree for Star Photography - https://kit.com/photorectoby/joshua-tree-adventure

Hands-on Review Canon T7i (800D) vs Nikon D5600

Canon T7i (800D) vs Nikon D5600 https://youtu.be/RgMMO1jCCz8The Nikon D5600 and Canon T7i (800D) share several specs

  • 24-MP (APS-C) Sensors
  • ISO range 100-25,600
  • 3 inch LCD Touchscreen though the D5600 is a little bigger (3.2") and offers the touchpad function when it is up to your eye.
  • 1080 at 60 fps
  • Bluetooth, WiFi and NFC connectivity - Though the D5600s snapbridge is a little more automated, automatically sending files across - with the Canon it is more of a conscious choice. I have been very frustrated with Nikon Snapbridge in the past - finding it flaky, confusing and downright broken, with the D5600 I have had a very smooth experience and prefer it to the Canon - But the Canon app provides a better experience for controlling the camera.

A few important differences - Nikon offers 39 AF points, 9 cross type, Canon offers 45 AF points all cross type - cross type offer a  higher accuracy and when you have more higher accuracy points the more likely you are to get moving subjects in accurate focus. Canon also offers dual pixel AF in live view - this is the very smooth and capable video focus, also useful for still photos in live view - Nikon’s video focusing is still distracting (it hunts more and is very noticeable when it refocuses) and while it’s a little quieter and smoother with their new AF-P lenses you still don’t want the lens to refocus during video, canon, however, is smooth and SILENT when paired with STM lensesThe Canon is faster offering 6fps, vs 5 in the Nikon and more importantly, the Canon offers a deeper buffer - up to 148 jpegs and 24 raw images before slowing down. Nikon slows down at 100 JPEGS and just 8 raw.  The buffer and the additional higher accuracy AF points make the Canon T7i my choice for any type of action, like sports or birds in flight, over the Nikon.  The Nikon is capable of fast focus and operation but you will find yourself limited to very short bursts if shooting RAW. The Nikon D5600, however, has an edge in image quality, especially as the light levels drop. I see a clear difference, the Nikon has no AA filter and provides more detailed images and as you raise the ISO less noise (you can also pick 1/3 stops of ISO - canon limited to full stops) Nikon D5600 on the left | Canon T7i on the rightNikon D5600 Frustrations (Especially for beginners)I find myself spending more time in live view - especially when I have a nice articulating screen that lets me set up for different angles and if you happen to have manual video mode on you are blocked from changing the aperture in manual mode in live view and you can’t select shutter speeds below 1/30 of a second.  There are workarounds, the easiest is to switch to aperture priority or shutter speed priority OR turn off manual movie mode but then frustratingly when you go to shoot a movie you have no idea what settings and no control no matter which mode you use. AND I really miss exposure simultaion when using the Nikon D5600 the T7i does and actually every other camera besides Nikon offers exposure simulation in Live view. When inn manual mode I would like to see the screen change to reflect my exposure and the Nikon only does that if you are in manual movie mode and once again we are back to being blocked from changing the aperture and from setting shutter speed below 1/30 of a second. These two issues are in no way deal breakers but they certainly make the camera more frustrating for me and when I work with beginners, teaching photography all over the world - being able to switch to live view and get that easy feedback of your exposure before you take a photo is a really useful tool.Summary and Conclusion - Nikon D5600 vs Canon T7i (800D)Reasons you might want to pick the Nikon D5600 - you value the smaller size, the better image quality (especially in lower light), The additional features like time lapse (Canon only offers movie lapse) and the exceptionally easy and automated Ssnapbridge image sharing. Reasons you might choose the Canon - Video is important to you, the Dual Pixel AF is smooth and sneaky good, you plan to photograph action and or you want a straightforward manual control experience.Other Options -The Panasonic G85 is even smaller, especially when you start comparing lenses - the micro 4/3rd system stays small even when you have a few primes in your bag AND shoots beautifully stabilized 4k video.  The Sony a6300 also shoots 4k and does very well in low light though it isn’t as user friendly as either of these cameras.   Which would you choose - I’d love to know your opinion?   And don't forget to pick up a prime lens or twoCanon T7i Strengths
 

Sigma 18-35 f/1.8 Best lens for APS-C Cameras

The Sigma 18-35 f/1.8 remains my pick for BEST crop (APS-C) sensor. Pairs well with Canon and Nikon. It is also possible to use the Sigma 18-35 on Micro 4/3 cameras, like the Panasonic GH4 and GH5 with Metabones Speed Booster Ultra (Canon EF-mount). Using the speed booster gives you an extra stop of aperture!Buy the Sigma 18-35 from B&H Photo Canon | NikonWant more zoom? The Sigma 50-100 is heavy but also fantastichttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWo3y7_8vcA

Upgrading from the Canon t4i to the Canon 80D

Upgrading from the Canon t4i to the Canon 80D | http://photorec.tvAfter a little more than four years of shooting exclusively with the Canon t4i, I upgraded to the Canon 80D. The Canon t4i was my entry into the world of DSLR photography and leaving it behind was a little bittersweet. I put my t4i through its paces shooting more than 40,000 images in light levels ranging from harsh sunlight to golden hour to low light in jazz clubs. My photography has included, but isn't limited to, cityscapes, landscapes, jewelry, pets, and food. The Canon Rebel line is well-built with intuitive menus, making it a great option for anyone just starting out with DSLR photography.When you're thinking about upgrading to a new camera body, the question is always will the upgrade really be worth it? Upgrading from a Canon t4i or older Rebel body to the Canon 80D is definitely worth it. Personally, the top four features I appreciate most with the upgrade are as follows:

  • Focus point and focus point systems. You're upgrading from nine single focus points to a 45 point cross-focus system.
  • Top deck display. The top deck display gives the shutter speed, aperture, ISO, Wi-Fi status, estimated exposure level, single shot vs. burst mode, battery life, and number of shots remaining on the memory card.
  • Live screen mode. The Canon 80D offers an intelligent viewfinder with approximately 100% viewfinder coverage, a significant upgrade from the t4i's noisy, slow, and largely ineffective live mode.
  • More ISO settings. In addition to having a slightly higher ISO capacity, the Canon 80D also has more ISO settings. The more ISO settings, the more control you have over your images. For example, when ISO 400 is too dark but ISO 800 is too bright, you can select ISO 500 or 640.

Of course, there are a number of other upgrades as well, such as megapixels, shutter lag, and JPEG and RAW shooting and buffer rates, all of which I include in the review.Finally, I discuss whether it's easy to make the transition to the Canon 80D from the Rebel line and if this upgrade is worth the price. Most likely, you already know that my answer to both of these questions is yes. You'll have no problem getting acclimated to the new menu system and will see a difference in your image quality within just a few days of shooting with the Canon 80D.Read the full post over on roseclearfield.com: Upgrading from the Canon t4i to the Canon 80D.

Do you own the Canon 80D?

Share your thoughts on this camera.

Are you considering purchasing the Canon 80D and still have questions?

Leave a comment! We're happy to help answer them.

 

More PhotoRec TV Canon 80D resources:

Hands-on Canon 80D Review vs the 70D, a6300 and more

 80Dvs77D

Reasons to buy the 80D over the 77D

SaveSave

Canon SL2/200D Leaked Photos and Specs | Updated

While Sony may be a great mirrorless system we all like Canon's SL1/100D/Kiss X7 (Toby's SL1 review) as it was a solid performer for an entry level camera and quite small. Thanks to Nokishita Camera we've got a few photos and specs of the SL2 to pass along after their 6D MII leak last week. Interesting to note, like the 6D MII coming down the line, the SL2 will also get an articulating LCD. If the given rumor holds true we'll have the official announcement later next week with the full specs of this tiny camera and the new 6D MII.Specs

  • Will ship in black, white, and silver designs
  • 24.2MP Sensor (same as the T7i)
  • DIGIC 7
  • Dual Pixel AF
  • 9 Focus point's with one cross-type
  • 95% viewfinder coverage with .87 magnification
  • ISO 100-25600 (extended 51200)
  • 5 frames/sec continuous shooting, 3.5 if Servo AF in live view
  • Shutter speed 1/4000 to 30 seconds, max flash sync speed 1/200
  • 5 axis electronic image stabilization for video
  • Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, NFC
  • Articulating LCD screen, 3"
  • SD / SDHC / SDXC card (UHS-I card compatible)
  • LP-E 17 Battery (same as T7i)
  • Size: 122.4 x 92.6 x 69.8mm
    • In comparison, the T7i is 131 x 99.9 x 76.2
  • Weight: 453g
    • In comparison, the T7i is 532g
Photos

Yellowstone National Park with the Canon T6i

My daughter and I just returned from a great camping trip to Yellowstone National Park - She used the Canon T6i with an old  Sigma 18-50 f/2.8 and a refurbished 55-250 STM Lens - here are a few of her favorite photos from the trip.   This entire package is affordable and capable of great results. Honestly it is more about going someplace interesting than the gear you use. 

Canon 6D Mark II Leaked Specs Include an Articulating LCD | Updated

For those wanting to make the jump to a Canon full frame but disappointed in the lack of an articulating LCD (swivel screen), Canon may have just fixed that with the Canon 6D Mark II LCD. Via NokishitaCamera, with the Canon Bodies going through certification at the moment a few specs have been leaked. If rumors hold true we'll be seeing the 6DMII announced in July with the SL2 and shipping shortly thereafter.Canon 6D Mark II Articulating Screen Composite - Photoshopped ImageAs Toby has said before having an articulating LCD is a must with today's cameras. Beyond just selfies the variable angles allow you to get shots that otherwise would be more than a bit difficult. Out of all the things for the 6DMII this was the one make it or break it item for many photographers I've talked to recently. Unfortunately playing devil's advocate though this does have its drawbacks. It's yet to be known how this affects the standard waterproofing found in Canon's higher end cameras. For those looking for a rugged full-frame camera, this might be an issue as well as adding another breaking point for their gear.With this leak is somewhat confirmed it's an interesting development and we'll find out shortly in the official announcements. As of this point with the SKU number's we should be seeing three different kit options and the 6DMII available as body only as well.Overall it's an exciting change as I expected it to go without the articulating LCD, we'll have more information out come July.Updated additional specs leaked (Via Nokishita Camera) :Following the updated specs of the t7i/77D the 6DMII looks like it's specs are roughly the same coming out as the recently released rebels. For current 6D owners getting 45 cross-type AF points using dual pixel autofocus should be a welcome upgrade. Missing unfortunately, is no 4K video, being a dealbreaker for some I'll bet.New specs coming out this week

  • 26.2 MP
  • 45 cross-type AF points
  • Dual-Pixel AF
  • DIGIC 7
  • 98% viewfinder coverage, .71 magnification
  • 6.5 frames/sec, 4 when using servo AF in live view
  • ISO 100-40,000 (extended ISO 50, 51200, and 102400)
  • Shutter speed 1/4000 to 30 seconds, 1/180 flash sync speed
  • Single SD card slot
  • Media: SD / SDHC / SDXC card (UHS-I card compatible)
  • Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, NFC, and GPS
  • Electronic level
  • 100% Viewfinder
  • Video Full HD 1080P at 60fps
  • 5 Axis electronic image stabilization for video
  • HDR movie mode, 4K timelapse movie mode
  • Battery: LP-E6N / LP-E6
  • New BG-E21 battery grip
  • Package kits include Canon EF 24-70mm f/4.0L IS USM, Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS II USM, and EF 24–105mm f/3.5–5.6 IS STM options.
  • Announcement due June 29, 2017
  • $1999 price
Updated images leaked (via Nokishita)

Battery Grips - 3rd Party are fine - SALE

Awesome savings - TODAY ONLY

 
I am asked about battery grips almost everyday and the question usually is -
Do I need to spend hundreds of dollars on my camera brand grips or can I buy 3rd party and save? 
I am happy to share that brands like these Vello on sale today at B&H Photo offer all of the quality and functions of the much more expensive Canon, Nikon and Sony branded.Benefits of a battery grip:
  • Doubles your shooting time (you now have 2 batteries in your camera
  • Makes smaller cameras easier to hold and more comfortable in hand
  • Provides easier portrait shooting with shutter buttons
  • Additional controls
  • Excellent for longer timelapses

B&H Photo Battery Grip Sale - Canon | Nikon | Sony | Panasonic | Fuji

How to Buy Used Camera Gear Online

Canon 70-200 f/4 | http://photorec.tvDSLR and mirrorless cameras and lenses are expensive. You want to buy great gear, but you don't want to break the bank. Buying used camera equipment allows you save money without compromising quality. However, it's important to be careful when purchasing used camera bodies and lenses. Before you load up your shopping cart and check out, take some time to familiarize yourself with the process of shopping for used gear online. Following a few key tips ensures you'll get a good deal on high-quality equipment and that if you don't, you'll be able to return it and get a refund.I got inspired to write about this topic after I saved $300 on a near perfect condition copy of the Canon 70-200 f/4 lens. The only damage is very minor and purely cosmetic. I reviewed multiple listings on Amazon and eBay over a couple of weeks to get a current, accurate price range. Ultimately, I decided to shop on Amazon with a retailer boasting a 95%+ positive rating and a listing with a Used - Very Good rating or better as well as a warranty. I couldn't be more happy with my purchase.In my post about buying used camera gear online, I cover the following topics:

  • Select a reputable website
  • If applicable, select a seller with a high rating
  • Research the current selling price range
  • Understand what you're getting with a given camera listing (i.e. lens hood, filters, warranty)
  • Pay attention to the condition of the item
  • If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask
  • If a deal sounds too good to be true, most likely it is too good to be true

Read the full post over on roseclearfield.com: How to Buy Used Camera Gear Online.Shop for used camera gear: Amazon | eBay. Using these links is a simple way to support photorec.tv without costing you anything extra. Thanks for your support!SaveSaveSave

Canon T7i (800D) vs Nikon D5600

Canon T7i (800D) vs Nikon D5600With the Nikon D5600 now available for the US and Canon T7i available for pre-order it's that time again for a bit of a comparison. At one point, Nikon had put on a good showing with the D5300 leading the market for photography while our video recommendation had been going to the Canon T5i. Since then Nikon camera's have been stagnating under minor updates while the  T7i got a decent upgrade in processing, sensor, connectivity, and focus certainly pushing it closer to the top of our list.

What's Different?

The T7i has faster autofocus that can see better in low light conditions and now includes 45 cross-type AF points. Live view focus uses the Dual Pixel AF which makes for smooth and cinematic like focusing for video. In comparison, the D5600 offers 39 AF points with only 9 being cross-type.  And live view focusing on the D5600 still uses the older, slower Contrast AF method.While the D5600 can't match the T7i's focusing it does come with new AF-P 18-55 lenses using stepping motors similar to Canon's STM system.  While we haven't tested the lenses yet stepping motors allow the camera smoother and quieter transitions while focusing for video. At the moment though Nikon's AF-P selection is very limited compared to the growing selection of Canon STM lenses.Autofocus - Canon T7i | Live View Autofocus: CanonNikon, since the D5300, has removed the anti-aliasing filter allowing for sharper photos. While the D5600 has seen improvements in connectivity it still uses the SnapBridge system which we do not recommend. Overall comparatively, you do save $100 going with Nikon, just enough for accessories such as a bag, batteries, or a tripod.Image Quality  - Sharpness: Nikon D5600 |Overall in this latest generation, things are looking strong for Canon. We'll have more on the T7i when Toby gets in a review unit soon. On paper at least Canon borrowed from the 80D enough to make a decent upgrade this year. Nikon still has its strength, which is crisp photos thanks to the removed filter, making a good choice. Canon keeps pushing ease of using making some very friendly cameras for a new DSLR beginner or someone that wants an upgrade from a previous model. Overall we have to give it to Canon as it makes for a better overall platform to use with great support and lens choices.Canon T7i Strengths

  • Smoother focusing Dual Pixel AF in Live view
  • 45 Cross-Type AF points  for faster focusing in low light
  • Ease of use
  • Better lens ecosystem, in this case primarily for entry-level users
  • Faster burst with deeper buffer

Nikon D5600 Strengths

  • No anti-aliasing filter allowing for sharper photos
  • Longer battery life
  • Smaller and slightly lighter
  • Better mobile app and connectivity vs Nikon SnapBridge
  • Better low light performance
  • Slightly cheaper
Specifications
Spec Canon T7i Nikon D5600
MP 24 24
ISO 100-25600 (expands to 51200) 100-25600
Processor Digic 7 Expeed 4
Number of AF pts 45 (all cross type) 39 (9 cross type)
Viewfinder Pentamirror 95% Pentamirror 95%
Anti-Alias Filter Yes No
Live View AF speed Excellent Good
Top Shutter Speed 1/4000 1/4000
Flash Sync Speed 1/200 1/200
FPS 6 5
Low Light focusing -3 EV (very good) -1
Video 1080p60 1080p60
Headphone Jack No No
Mic Jack Yes Yes
Connectivity WIFI/NFC/Bluetooth LE WIFI/NFC/Bluetooth
Battery Life 600 Shots 820 Shots
Weight 532 g (1.17 lb / 18.77 oz) 465 g (1 lb 0.4 oz / 16.04 oz)
Current Price $1299 with 18-135$899 with 18-55$749 Body $1,196.95 with 18-140$796.95 with 18-55$1,146.95 with 18-55 and 70-300$696.95 Body
Order Today!
Canon EOS Rebel T7i

Canon EOS T7i Line

amazon

Nikon D5600 DSLR Camera with 18-55mm Lens

Nikon D5600 Line

amazon

Photo Comparison
Nikon D5600(left) vs Canon T7i(right) front view
Nikon D5600(left) vs Canon T7i(right) back view
Nikon D5600(left) vs Canon T7i(right) top view
Nikon D5600(left) vs Canon T7i(right) right view
Nikon D5600(left) vs Canon T7i(right) left view

Canon T7i (800D) vs 77D (9000D)

Canon T7i vs 77DA new year and new Canons to match with the newly announced Canon T7i (800D) and 77D (9000D). Odd's are you're wondering a bit where the 77D fits in, both Toby and I have been asked a lot this week. On paper, it's a replacement to the T6S as a bridge camera between the entry level T7i and 80D.  While making the product line and obscure Canon naming just slightly harder it makes things a bit more drawn out with the bare bones budget T6, the new entry level T7i for beginners, the 77D making a step up with video, then going to the 80D as a truly semi-pro platform.

What's New?

While not a massive update we do get a few new tricks in these models as nice improvements brought down from the higher end models. While that might not sound impressive what is on the menu will make for a notable improvement. Maybe not enough to jump only one generation but if your camera is getting a little long in the tooth, such as a T4i, there is a good bit to be gained by an upgrade to say the 77D.Upgrades and New FeaturesT7i 45-point all cross-type AF

  • Going with the biggest improvement first, !!!DUAL PIXEL AF!!! for both cameras. Brought down from the higher tier cameras this allows for smoother autofocus during live view
  • Improved low light focusing, and a faster lock on time using 45 cross-type AF points.  Upgraded from 19 to 45 AF points is a serious boost in performance!
  • Digic 7 processors which should provide slightly better low light/high ISO performance
  • Bluetooth along with Wifi and NFC and also remote control using the BR-E1 Remote
  • Video time-lapse mode
  • And this is all in a slightly smaller, slightly lighter, camera bodies

https://youtu.be/bpERpJG7VDY

What's Different?

In the T7i (800D) you get the basics and just that, while in the 77D (9000D) you get body improvements in line with the higher end cameras for a more professional and easier manual control. So what is different? Like the T6i/T6s cameras, the difference is mostly in the body with the 77D offering a very slightly larger body that offers a top LCD screen, a rear dial, lock switch and an eye sensor used to turn off the LCD when you bring your eye up to the viewfinder. When shooting side to side there is no difference in photo or video quality.

The Canon 77D (9000D) offers the same performance and sensor as the T7i (800D)

T7i

77D

  • Top LCD screen
  • Rear Dial
  • Lock Switch
  • Eye Sensor
  • AI Focus
  • 5-axis digital image stabilization during video
Specifications
Spec CanonT7i Canon77D
MP 24 24
ISO 100-25600 (expands to 51200) 100-25600 (expands to 51200)
Processor Digic 7 Digic 7
Number of AF pts 45 (all cross type) 45 (all cross type)
Viewfinder Canon T7i Canon 77D
Live View AF speed Excellent Excellent
Top Shutter Speed 1/4000 1/4000
Flash Sync Speed 1/200 1/200
FPS 6 6
Low Light focusing -3 EV (very good) -3 EV (very good)
Video 1080p60 1080p60
Headphone Jack No No
Mic Jack Yes Yes
Connectivity WIFI/NFC/Bluetooth LE WIFI/NFC/Bluetooth LE
Battery Life 600 Shots 600 shots
Weight 532 g (1.17 lb / 18.77 oz) 540 g (1.19 lb / 19.05 oz)
Current Price $1299 with 18-135 | $749 Body $1499 with 18-135 | $899 Body
 Pre-order Today!
Canon EOS Rebel T7i

Canon EOS T7i Line

amazon

Canon EOS 77D

Canon EOS 77D Line

amazon

Photo Comparison
Canon T7i vs 77D
Canon T7i vs 77D
Canon T7i vs 77D
Canon T7i vs 77D
Canon T7i vs 77D
Sample Images
 

Just Announced! Canon Rebel T7i (800D), 77D (9000D), M6, and 18-55mm IS STM Kit Lens

Canon has announced new DSLRS - with Dual Pixel AF

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpERpJG7VDYAnd an updated mirrorless camera!  SO Canon just announced - a Canon T7i (800D), a 77D (9000D) and the M6 (mirrorless camera) - If you are trying to figure out where the new 77D fits in the line up you are not alone - I have had a handful of confused readers write in over the last week, based on our post about the leaked specs, asking what the Canon 77D offers vs the Canon 80D.   I have a quick comparison below but briefly the 77D is the successor to the T6s and the T7i is the successor to the Canon T6i.  Canon will continue to offer the T6i making their line of Rebels quite large with a T5, T6, Sl1, T5i, T6i, T6s, T7i, 70D, 77D, 80D ALL still being offered/sold.. That's quite the lineup.  The big headline - DUAL PIXEL AF is in the new cameras!! That is the fast and smooth AF during live view - immensely helpful for video and makes using live view a much more pleasant experience.  Additionally Canon has shrunk the T7i a bit more, this makes me think we will not see a SL2 anytime soon.A quick comparison of the two new DSLRS the T7i and the 77D with the older T6i/T6s and the 80D. below the chart I have a few more differences between the 77D and the T7i and some recommendations about which you might want to buy.

Spec Canon 80D Canon T6s/T6i (750/760D) Canon T7i (800D) Canon 77D (9000D)
MP 24 24 24 24
ISO 100-16,000 100-12,800 100-25600 (expands to 51200) 100-25600 (expands to 51200)
Processor Digic 6 Digic 6 Digic 7 Digic 7
Number of AF pts 45 (all cross type) 19(all cross type) 45 (all cross type) 45 (all cross type)
Viewfinder 100% pentaprism 95% pentamirror 95% pentamirror 95% pentamirror
Live View AF speed Excellent Good Excellent Excellent
Top Shutter Speed 1/8000 1/4000 1/4000 1/4000
Flash Sync Speed 1/250 1/200 1/200 1/200
FPS 7 (live view 5 with AF) 5 (live ~1 with AF) 6 6
Low Light focusing -3 EV (very good) -0.5 (ok) -3 EV (very good) -3 EV (very good)
Video 1080p60 1080p30 1080p60 1080p60
Headphone Jack Yes No No No
Mic Jack Yes Yes Yes Yes
Connectivity WIFI/NFC WIFI/NFC WIFI/NFC/Bluetooth WIFI/NFC/Bluetooth
Battery Life 960 shots 440 shots 600 Shots 600 shots
Weight 730g (1.61 lb / 25.75 oz) 565 g (1.25 lb / 19.93 oz) 532 g (1.17 lb / 18.77 oz) 540 g (1.19 lb / 19.05 oz)
Current Price $1499 with 18-135 | $1099 Body $1049 T6s with 18-135 | $849 Body $1299 with 18-135 |$749 Body $1499 with 18-135 | $899 Body

What's new?

The T7i/77D now offer Dual Pixel AF, much improved low light AF performance and 45 cross-type AF points, Digic 7 processors which should provide slightly better low light/high ISO performance, Bluetooth and a new battery providing better battery life over the T6s/T6i models. And a video time-lapse mode.  And this is all in a slightly smaller, slightly lighter body.

The Canon 77D offers the same performance and sensor as the T7i

So what is different? Like the T6i/T6s cameras the difference is mostly in the body with the 77D offering a very slightly larger body that offers a top LCD screen, a rear dial, lock switch and an eye sensor used to turn off the LCD when you bring your eye up to the viewfinder.  They both use the same NEW battery.Canon t7i vs Canon 77DCanon 77D(left) vs Canon T7i(right) top view

Canon T7i (800D) vs Canon 77D (9000D)

This is easy - If you are considering these cameras I expect you want to shoot manually and the 77D with the rear dial and top LCD screen make this a more manual friendly camera.  I talk more about this in my T6s review  If you are on a strict budget the T7i saves you some money that you could use to buy the 50mm f/1.8 STM lens 

Canon 77D vs 80D

This is a tougher decision. The real strengths of the 80D - bigger battery providing almost 1,000 shots per charge, weather sealing and a significantly faster top shutter speed at 1/8000 of a second along with a headphone jack make this a more professionally capable camera for photographers and videographers.  If you are a casual photographer the 77D offers savings and a camera the will provide more than enough power for you. If you plan to become more serious about your photography or videography the 80D offers just that much more room to grow that I do recommend purchasing.

About that Mirrorless Camera the M6

it is NOT replacing the M5, this will be an additional model alongside the M5. The improvement between the two will be the M6 includes stabilization for video and they have removed the EVF - providing an optional EVF you can attach in the hotshoe. This makes the camera a little more compact but in my opinion a lot less desirable. I want an EVF on ALL my cameras - otherwise bright sunny conditions make it very hard to see what's happening on the back of the LCD. (more soon)

Other interesting bits-

These new cameras now offer Bluetooth LE for additional connectivity options and Canon is releasing a Bluetooth wireless remote. The BR-E1, price $50, is capable of triggering the camera up to 16 feet. It can also control that lens zoom, PZ-E1, that was released with the 80D.

T7i

Available to pre-order through 

Canon EOS Rebel T7i
77D

Available to pre-order through 

Canon EOS 77D
M6

Available to pre-order through 

Canon EOS M6 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 15-45mm Lens (Black) Canon EVF-DC2 Electronic Viewfinder
18-55mm F/4-5.6IS STM lens

Available to pre-order through 

Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Lens
BR-E1 WirelessRemote Control

Available to pre-order through 

Canon BR-E1
 

Canon Rumors for CP+: Updated

Update 2/14: Prices and more item details added. The CP+ Show in Japan is coming February 23rd and it's expected Canon will be announcing products today for the show. With the arrival, there's a handful of Canon rumors and leaked images for what's coming down the line. We'll be getting a refresh with new T7 rebels, a M6 mirrorless, 18-55mm lens, and more. Somewhat oddly, Canon has decided to go from the Ti/Ts name convention to a new 77D for the T6s line of cameras.As a note, no SL2 mentions recently to go with this batch of camera news.  The given rumor was a SL2 release at CP+ last year, then CES, but it went by without a blip. The SL1 while entry level was quite popular and we still get asked about it now. As for the SL line's small size it seems Canon is focusing on the M6 for now.Canon EOS T7i 

  • Will be available in the new 18-55 f/4-5.6 IS STM lens below and the older 18-135mm STM
  • Price will run $749 for the body only
  • Specifications
    • 24.2 MP
    • DIGIC 7
    • Dual Pixel CMOS AF
    • 6 FPS Burst
    • ISO 100 -25600
    • Full HD Video, 5-axis electronic image stabilization
    • LCD: Type 3 Touch Panel Bali Angle LCD
    • Built-in WiFi / Bluetooth
    • Dimensions: 131.0 × 99.9 × 76.2 mm
    • Weight: 532 g

Canon EOS 77d

  • 77D will be the replacement to the T6s with a different naming convention
  • Prices will run $899 (body only), $1049 with the new 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM, and $1499 with the older 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM.
  • Specifications
    • 24.2 MP
    • DIGIC 7
    • Dual Pixel CMOS AF
    • AF point: 45 points
    • 6 FPS Burst
    • ISO 100 -25600
    • LCD: Type 3 Touch Panel Bali Angle LCD
    • Built-in Wi-Fi / Bluetooth
    • Dimensions: 131.0 × 99.9 × 76.2 mm
    • Weight: 540 g

Canon EOS M6 Mirrorless

  • Coming in black and silver
  • Packaged body only, with a 15-45mm kit lens, a 18-150mm kit lens, or a double lens kit
  • Also coming, sold separately, with the M6 is a Canon EVF-DC 2 viewfinder attachment
  • Body only Price will be $779
  • Specifications
    • 24.2 MP
    • DIGIC 7
    • 49 Point AF
    • 7 FPS (9 if auto focus is fixed)
    • ISO 100 -25600
    • Shutter Speed: 1/4000 - 30
    • Sync Speed: 1/200
    • Video: Full HD, HD, VGA
    • LCD: Type 3 tilt type touch panel
    • Recording medium: SD / SDHC / SDXC card
    • Built-in WiFi / Bluetooth
    • Size: 112.0 × 68.0 × 44.5 mm

Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/4-5.6 IS STM

  • A new kit lens that will be packaged with the kit lenses and available separately. Something to note is that it's aperture is just slightly slower then the current generation of kit lens.
  • Lens construction: 12 elements in 10 groups
  • Minimum shooting distance: 0.25 m
  • Filter: 58 mm
  • Size: 66.5 x 61.8 mm Weight: 215 g

Canon BR-E 1

  • A Bluetooth wireless remote, shown below

Canon EH30-CJ

  • A body jacket for the announced M6
Rumors and photos via Nokishita, Digicame-Info